4 Ways to Impress Your Professor
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4 Ways to Impress Your Professor

With it being the first week of classes at many Caribbean medical schools, you’re probably neck deep in studying. It’s a good idea to get to know your professors at early on. They’re excellent resources, who will ultimately write your residency recommendations and potentially give you networking opportunities down the line. Here are some ways you can impress your professors.

Ask Questions

Medical school courses are dense with complex information that can easily break the minds of non-medical students. There’s bound to be something that slips through. Asking questions shows you’re engaged and you’ve familiarized yourself with the material before class. Remember, there are no stupid questions but refusing to ask questions is kind of stupid.

Show Up for Office Hours 

Even though office hours are a suggestion, you should make it a requirement. You’ll not only understand your study materials better – but your professor too. They’ll provide insight into how they have applied the material in their careers and possibly mentor you. That’ll be especially useful when it comes to deciding where you want to specialize after graduating. AUA professors typically keep office hours long after what’s on their schedule.

Improve on Your Studies

Every medical student (and physician) is a work in progress. You won’t always get perfect grades but you can devote yourself to getting better. Your professor will definitely take notice. It shows that you’re willing to work hard and, like most physicians, are dedicated to continuously learning more about medicine throughout your life.

Inquire About Research Opportunities

Research! Doing research is great for your residency application and also shows your professor that you’re truly passionate about studying medicine. Most professors conduct their own research so if you’ve done all of the above, you’ve given them great reason to include you in their work. Plus, there’s nothing better than seeing your name published in a prestigious medical journal. You’d be a member of the global medical community long before you graduate.

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