Student Voices

The Compassion Deficit: A Student’s Perspective

Prakash Jayanthi, College of Medicine June 27, 2013
My friend sent me an article recently. It is actually quite an interesting read. Here’s the TL;DR version: it is about how there is a seemingly large drop off of empathy and compassion in medical students in the first flush of third year. It doesn’t really offer much in the way of a solution, instead tailing off towards the end by just suggesting most people would rather a doctor take care of them than an iPhone. The point I wished to address is what I am now calling Clinical...

A Medical Emergency on the Last Day of Pediatrics

Justin Capasso, College of Medicine June 20, 2013
It was 4:45pm on the last day of my Pediatrics rotation.  Our last patient was being brought into an exam room, and I noticed something a little out of the ordinary: the patient, a six or seven year old boy, was being carried by his father.  The medical assistant asked the father to put the boy down on the scale, but the boy refused.  He was curled up in his arms and did not want to move at all.  His father said that he has had a pain in his stomach for the last two hours...

Chaos is a Ladder or how clinical rotations can be overwhelming

Prakash Jayanthi, College of Medicine June 13, 2013
So you’re a few weeks into your rotations. You’re slowly starting to find your place in the puzzle. You’re cog in the machinery. You’re (hopefully) wise man in the nativity. The joy mountain of playing around in a hospital is slowly being eroded into the sand of cynicism via the waves of daily life. You come to realize that while a lot of medicine is about medicine, a ton more is paperwork. And you realize that you are not really at the bottom of the ladder. You are...

What Makes AUA (and Antigua) Unique

Charles Seaton, College of Medicine May 15, 2013
I’ve never blogged before.  That’s why when I was asked to blog about my experiences as an AUA student, what excitement I had was short-lived and promptly replaced by a foreboding sense of apprehension.  I realized I wasn’t sure I had anything to say and imagined myself staring catatonically at my laptop screen.  If I did manage to find something to say, how would it be received?  Would AUA’s administration rain hellfire and damnation down on me if...

My Life on the Island

Ryan Groshon, College of Medicine April 30, 2013
The Delta Airlines, Boeing 737-800 jet lurched and the tires chirped as it touched down on the runway of Antigua's VC Byrd Intl. Airport.  My face was glued to the window as I was surveying the area that was going to be my home for the next few years.  From 30,000 feet, it looked pretty nice.  White sandy beaches, clear turquoise water, and lush green hills. It looked nice and comfortable from the air-conditioned cabin.  That all came to an abrupt end when the door...

Adjusting to the New World of Clinical Sciences

Justin Capasso, College of Medicine April 19, 2013
  While studying basic science in Antigua, you have a set schedule. You know that you will be home from class at a certain time and you can set aside a certain number of hours each day to study.  In the clinical semesters, time management becomes your best friend.  Studying has to be approached in a different way as your schedule is constantly changing.  Some days at the hospital have a lot of downtime, so you have to be ready to study whenever you find yourself with...

Our Experience with the Couples Match

Anita Maraj & Alexandr Dron, College of Medicine April 10, 2013
When we entered the match, we initially thought that we would remain uncoupled because, as IMGs, we were told that we would be limited in our options. We found that to be far from reality. Like many couples trying to match together, we were afraid because of the lack of information regarding the process and the many misconceptions and misinformation out there. These are some tips that we found to be vital to our success in couples matching. Submit Your Application on Time We can't...

Recognizing the Need – The Origins of the AUA Emergency Response Team

Ryan Groshon, College of Medicine March 12, 2013
During my lecture, I could hear the emergency sirens wailing.   After being on this island a few semesters, I knew it was pretty rare to hear sirens, especially not that many of them.  I knew something serious must have happened.  When I drove home, I saw the aftermath of a terrible accident.  A car rested on its roof on the side of the road, driver still in the upside down vehicle, debris and shattered glass were scattered on both sides of the road. Before coming to...